Carrot, Walnut and Quinoa Salad

 I had planned on making three dishes tonight but after the amazing Tabbouleh I decided to forget about one of them and just put this really simple carrot salad together.

This is probably the best carrot salad that I’ve ever eaten. What makes it super amazing is the walnuts and the red chilli. Phenomenal.

This salad is also from The Superfood Diet by Gurpareet Bains. New book – two out of two great recipes.

I’d already held back a small amount of cooked Quinoa from the Tabbouleh; and again that is the only cooked element. Putting it together you add walnuts, a red chilli, a shallot, fresh coriander and garlic to mirin, white wine vinegar, and walnut oil. To this mix add your grated carrot and your cooked Quinoa.

I grated half the carrot recommended in the recipe – not out of laziness – I just thought the picture in the book looked too carroty. I wanted to see the Quinoa and the chillies and for it to look more interesting. I think this was a great move.

You serve the dish with some poppy seeds sprinkled over the top. I didn’t have any so I used nigella seeds instead.

Like the Tabbouleh this dish definitely benefits from an hour in the fridge for the flavours to develop. This salad will be seen again at this weekend’s BBQ – weather permitting!

Sesame Roast Carrots

Sesame Roast Carrots

Doesn’t everyone always have a bag of carrots lying around in the bottom of the fridge. I know I do. Every time I go shopping I get carrots and I never use them all. They are so cheap that you always just buy a bag, use 2 and leave the rest to shrivel up in the fridge.

Well this dish could be the answer. Well – a better answer than carrot and coriander soup – which I just don’t enjoy!

Another offering from Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall’s River Cottage Light and Easy cookbook, this does use up a kilo of carrots with minimum effort.

Simply prep the carrots, toss in sesame seed and rapeseed oil and roast. Season them and roast them until they caramelise. Job done!

But what’s that you see in the picture – raisins? While the carrots are roasting simmer some runny honey and some orange zest and juice and add some raisins. Turn off the heat and let them soak up the juice.

When the carrots are ready, add the raisins and serve with a little chopped parsley. Very simple indeed.

I had every intention of serving these as a side yesterday but it got too late to eat – so I ended up eating these on their own for lunch. I didn’t have anything else to eat as my Ocado order doesn’t come until tomorrow morning.

These are quite sweet and very orangey  – the carrots really soaked up the juices from the raisins. Not sure they work on their own. Probably better to serve these with something more substantial.

Spicy Carrot Salad

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One thing I really struggle with is taking photographs of Orange food with an iPhone. All the pictures on this site are taken with my iPhone – and nearly all of them look acceptable – apart from the orange and really purple things. No idea why! Anyway – apologies for the photos of this dish!

On Thursday we got home a little too late and all I could think of making in a short span of time was this. Another dish from Yotam Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem book.

This is essentially some steamed carrots mixed with some spices. Very simple but very tasty. Another dish I made in less than 30 minutes !

While the carrots are steaming (or boiling as it says in the book) you fry some onions with some harissa, cumin and caraway seeds. Once the carrots are done you slice them, add them to the onion and spices, with some cider vinegar and sugar.

Then you just serve them with some rocket. It is recommended that you leave this dish for a while for the flavours of the onion and spice mix to infuse into the carrots.

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It doesn’t get simpler than that really. In reality this is just a side dish – but given the time of day this ended up being our main meal. Typically this would be a meze dish and as Ottolenghi says you could experiment and substitute the carrots for either pumpkin or butternut squash.

The recipe calls for Pilpelchuma (or Filfel chuma if you are searching wiki) – which is very similar to harissa anyway – although it is implied it might be a little more spicy. There’s a recipe later in the book to make it yourself but I just didn’t have the time – maybe some other time!

Freya thought this was too spicy. I really liked it.

One thing I’d change is to lightly crush the carrots. I don’t like the appearance of carrots when they are just sliced – reminds me of Sunday Roasts and school dinners – they look a bit primitive this way – whereas the crushed look is far more trendy and visually appealing.